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Unicorn Pop Porn

  • Box43 Müllerstrasse 43 8004 Zürich (map)

Box43 is very proud to announced the solo show: UNICORN POP PORN 
by young and talented swiss painter Yannick Lambelet.

For his first exhibition in Zurich, Yannick Lambelet has made a new painting referring to digital trash culture and Internet language.

Geeks and pervs are more than welcome.

VERNISSAGE at 19:00
FREE MOJITOS
DJSET at 19:30

Box43
Müllerstrasse 43
Zurich

www.yannicklambelet.com
www.box43.ch

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UNICORN POP PORN

Yannick Lambelet’s paintings have the distinctive feature of what you could call «collage 2.0 ». As a point of departure of his body of work, the young swiss painter from Lausanne reinterprets the age-old technique of collage by adapting it to new technologies which are now available in the arsenal of contemporary arts practice. 
He collects images on the Internet, being Google an unlimited source of inspiration, and handles these elements by creating a digital "collage" which finds its materialization onto the canvas. By selecting seemingly arbitrary images on the Web, Yannick Lambelet saturates his compositions with heterogenic cultural references, which, reassembled, create a complex symbolic compostion. The transformation through digital editing subjects the images to a recontextualisation, which offers a new look on these elements emerging from the catchall of Pop Culture represented by the Internet. Yannick Lambelet gives thus the opportunity to observe, what constitutes a major aspect of our contemporary cultural heritage, in which the internet allows for compilation and synthesis. He questions in this way ethnographically our relationship to this dematerialized and virtualized heritage, which is nevertheless nothing less than the biggest archive of images, ever aquired by humanity.

For the exhibition “Unicorn pop porn” at Box43, Yannick Lambelet radicalizes his pictorial approach. Until now he adopted demiurgic gesture, in which he “resurrected” images that were previously reduced to a digital state. By returning images to their original materiality, the artist adopts this time a “Dr. Frankenstein” way of creating, since he tries to “give life” to computer-generated images that only exist in a digitized state. The passage from virtuality to materiality follows a process similar to that already evoked: selection of images and editing of the composition on the virtual canvas and materialization on the real canvas through painting. As well as Dr. Frankenstein’s creature, the work of Yannick Lambelet does not however hide its experimental aspects: the collage is flagrant, the sutures are visible, the virtual origin of the different elements is reaffirmed and even strengthened by the puzzling presence of an abstract coloured flat background. The strange result of this creative process is a fascinating hybrid between virtuality and materiality, neither completely living, nor completely dead, just like the zombies in the exhibited composition. Even if the material object is concrete, it causes discomfort out of the lack of emotion proceeding from the painting, reminiscent of the purely virtual origin of the composing elements of the composition. Yannick Lambelet plays here more than ever with registers, halfway between Digital Art and the Classicism of the pictorial medium.

On the occasion of his incursion into the digital, the young painter decides to explore the dregs of the virtual pictorial language. It is the dark, and at the same time, practically ontological side in this virtual heritage that is staged in the cold reference to pornography, which the Web is full of. Yannick Lambelet asserts here in a direct way its ethnographical posture by his flat refusal to classify registers, fundamentally considering the culture as an agglomerate of rites and representations without hierarchy.

Nevertheless, beyond the brutality of the first contact with the exposed work, it is the tribute to digital imagery that also strikes. A second more distant look enables to identify the protagonists of the pornographic scene as Chris Redfield and Piers Nivans, characters from the apocalyptic video game Resident Evil 6. A whole new part of the Internet culture spreads onto the canvas: the constant reappropriation of references and symbols that pass through the Web. As well as the collage, it also seems here to be a reinterpretation of a hundred-year-old artistic technique, of which Duchamp’s moustachioed Mona Lisa is only an example among others. 

This is how the unicorn, coming from the popular mobile phone video game Robot Unicorn Attack 2, seems here to recuperate its medieval symbolic of the absolute purity, counterbalancing the primary pornographic obscenity of the composition.

The multiplication of symbols conveyed in the work allows these “collage” elements, at first sight heterogeneous, to start communicating with each other. “Unicorn pop porn” pays tribute to the Internet culture in all its characteristics, the virtual technological phenomenon it represents, its capacity to break the codes by diverting them ceaselessly, or the fact that it is a perfect representation of our contemporary culture in all its paradoxies and heterogeneousness.

text by Simon Wursten, art history student at UNIL
translation by Marco Nicolas Heinzen & Yannick Lambelet

Earlier Event: March 28
Raid
Later Event: April 3
Shimabuku - Flying me